Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Day 83: Aimee Shattuck

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Day 82: Suzanne Steinberg

I do paintings of flowers...I first started because they reminded me of a happy memory when my mother was pruning roses when I was a child. I now like roses because I feel I can put a great deal of sensitivity in them, and they help me direct my emotions sometimes back to mother earth. I find when I look at the roses I see a fragile piece of my soul, a piece of me that is beyond my own ability to communicate. This visualization of apart of my heart helps bind me to the physical space within my own body and the outside world. I think the roses give me an intimate constant growing piece of myself, like a leaf among the stem of our ever evolving gratification, pain, morality and humanity of the perspective towards contrast. I know they are simple, but they are my own unspoken spaces


























Monday, April 24, 2017

Day 81: Choko Art (Dan Aponte)

“I use painting as a way of communication to explain my perspectives and world views. My artwork is a representation of my inner self and the way society has an effect on my way of thinking. There is no better way for me to speak than with brush strokes and symbolical imagery.” The process of my creations begins reflecting on the world we live in and its social polemics. With pen and paper in hand I give color and shape to today's social phenomenons. After a journey of thoughts and pencil strokes I move to the canvas to start creating message composed of symbolism and criticism hoping that anybody can relate to it and help me make some sense of this world we live in. whether it is oil paint or pixel colors; I always find a way to execute my ideas no matter which medium is available at hand. oil paint allows me to enhance my message due its bold colors as well as the high contrast between its bright whites and dark blacks. Digital painting gives me the power to achieve a limitless chromatic array to translate any passionate idea that is better communicated in this medium. Surrealism style is the fittest to my creative needs. This style grants me the opportunity to create social critics, experiences in life and ideals. I deliver a message using symbolism and analogies. “Art is my language and sharing my voice with others is my purpose.“ Dan “Choko” Aponte
IG: artistchoko


Anoxeria


Bread and Butter


Depedencyville


St Elgoog

Sunday, April 23, 2017

Day 80: Arthur Owsley

My name is Arthur Owsley, My life has been spent in dedication to bettering my art. When looking at my body of work, one would notice all of the recurring subjects and images. Owls, jellyfish, dragonflies, cicadas, feathers, and bones are only a few of the images that I use to create my compositions. There is purpose to this: each character, each subject, and each image is decorated as a religious figure. 
 
This is where I draw my influence: The importance of religious and cultural art. It's development and repetition throughout history is what I try to exemplify in my work. By combining different cultural and religious symbols, figures, and patterns with modern schemes and styles I imbue an existential importance to the subject matter. 
 
I have an underlying goal in my life when it comes to my work.: I think that legacy is an important concept to any artist, my aspiration for my legacy is a little different from what others may be. If I were buried in a crypt with my body of work and was discovered in the distant future, I would want historians to be able to decipher the narrative and themes hidden in the religion of my work.

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Day 79: Chris Saper




“Over the past twenty-four years, I've painted nearly every day, and through a combination of painting, teaching and writing, have learned more than I'd ever dreamed possible about color. It's glorious in every way, from the translucent skin tones of the fairest redhead, to the riotous, explosive colors of bougainvillea.” —Chris Saper

Since beginning her commission portrait painting practice in 1991, Saper has completed almost 400 commissioned portraits nationally, authored four books and filmed four DVDs on portraiture. "I love the discipline of working with clients in a shared vision of the portrait to be painted. There's a satisfying result when I can achieve beautiful skin tones, accurate likenesses, and yet still paint a lovely piece of art."

Chris's newest instructional book, Classic Portrait Painting in Oils: Keys to Mastering Diverse Skin Toneswas released by North Light Books in January, 2012. She has also authored North Light Books' Painting Beautiful Skin Tones in Color and Light (2001), For Love or Money: a Business Handbook for Portrait Painters and Mostly Monochchrome (also at www.Blurb.com).

She has also been published in:

Saper's first two instructional DVDs, Painting Oil Portraits in Warm Light and Capturing the Beauty of Monochrome Oil Portraits were created in conjunction with www.artistsnetwork.tv, a division of North Light Books. Her latest DVDs, Painting Oil Portraits in Cool Light and Mixing Skin Tones were released in December 2011.

Saper's passion for color and design is a natural segue into painting the opulent still life and floral work for which she is rapidly becoming known. Saper's body of still life work has been described as lush, confident and lively.

A native of Wisconsin, she holds a Bachelor's Degree in Fine Arts and a Master's Degree in Health Care Administration. She has lived in Phoenix, AZ since 1977. 

In addition to Chris's portrait commission schedule, she is an active public speaker/painting demonstrator. She has served on the Faculty of the Portrait Society of America and has taught portraiture at the Scottsdale Artist's School, the Mountain Artists' Guild in Prescott, AZ, and the Connecticut Society of Portrait Artists. Saper has exhibited at the US Senate Rotunda, The Salmagundi Club and The National Arts Club in New York City, the Bennington Center for the Arts, the Tempe Arts Center and the Insight Gallery in Fredericksburg, TX.


The Best of Portrait Painting
Artist's Magazine
American Artist
International Artist Magazine
Pastel Artist International


Saper's first two instructional DVDs, Painting Oil Portraits in Warm Light and Capturing the Beauty of Monochrome Oil Portraits were created in conjunction with www.artistsnetwork.tv, a division of North Light Books. Her latest DVDs, Painting Oil Portraits in Cool Light and Mixing Skin Tones were released in December 2011.

Saper's passion for color and design is a natural segue into painting the opulent still life and floral work for which she is rapidly becoming known. Saper's body of still life work has been described as lush, confident and lively.

A native of Wisconsin, she holds a Bachelor's Degree in Fine Arts and a Master's Degree in Health Care Administration. She has lived in Phoenix, AZ since 1977.

In addition to Chris's portrait commission schedule, she is an active public speaker/painting demonstrator. She has served on the Faculty of the Portrait Society of America and has taught portraiture at the Scottsdale Artist's School, the Mountain Artists' Guild in Prescott, AZ, and the Connecticut Society of Portrait Artists. Saper has exhibited at the US Senate Rotunda, The Salmagundi Club and The National Arts Club in New York City, the Bennington Center for the Arts, the Tempe Arts Center and the Insight Gallery in Fredericksburg, TX.
Heidi, oil, commissioned portrait

Charlotte L oil

Denise Resnik


Boy in Blue, oil, commissioned portrait


Catie, oil








Friday, April 21, 2017

Day 78: Marilyn Miller

Marilyn was born in Fargo, North Dakota. Arrived in Phoenix in 1954. She and her four children, six grand children and great grand daughter live in Phoenix Arizona.
She considers her art to be uplifting to her spirit. Her subjects include Minnesota, travels, still life, and landscapes.
Her art has been exhibited at Arizona Art Alliance exhibits, Glendale arts council exhibit at Saguaro Ranch Park, and the Nash Jazz venue on first street and Roosevelt.
She has studied with Raliegh Kinney, Walter Powell, Dick Phillips, and EllenJean Diedrich.  Also at the University of Nevada in Reno.
Social media include, facebook, fineartamerica.com, mnartists.org
mmmiller_1999@yahoo.com


 Homestead Nostalgia   16"x 20"W Acrylic


Sun Bouquet                  15" x 11"W   water color    


Minnesota Log Cabin     11" x 15"W   water color
Grazing in the Meadow   15" x 22" W  water color

Morning Visitor                15" x 11" W   water color

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Day 77 :Therosia Reynolds

Therosia is a local artist.  She grew up in South Phoenix and is an Arizona native. Having gone through years of a life threatening sickness called "Pseudo Tumor Cerebra", she endured periods of lost eye sight and decreased mobility as a young woman. While she began drawing at a very young age, her time of illness made her artwork and music even more important to help her develop and maintain mobility as well encouragement. Having been healed, she now uses artwork to inspire hope, faith and love. She consistently uses her talents as an artist, singer and poet to raise funds to free slaves from sex trafficking via her non-profit Love2Life. Her signature on all paintings SDG stands for Soli Deo Gloria meaning Glory for God alone to reflect her belief that all honor ultimately belongs to God.
Instagram: @iamtherosia 
Facebook: Therosia
Those who wish can join me for art classes through www.yourartparty.com and learn to recreate the piece themselves.Prints are available for all the pieces.


The Greatist $1,800


Sang Your Soul $1,500

Delightful, no longer for purchase


Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Day 67: David F Horton

David F Horton was born in Tulsa & raised in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.  He started to create in 2009 mostly using digital photography and computer software.  Later, David started painting with watercolor and acrylic paint in an attempt to recreate the digital work and eventually started to draw with pen & ink defining his current style. Both parents were artists having a mother who was a talented sketch artist and a father that painted landscapes in oil. David's inspiration was born out of a need to calm post-traumatic stress from the suicide deaths of my mother and older brother. David dedicated his career studying medicine, currently working as an Invasive Cardiac Technologist in an emergency cardiac cath Lab in Fort Mohave, Arizona. 
David is a self-taught artist relying on inspiration from music and intuition to express his type of unique expression. The majority of David's work is expressionism, abstract surreal illustration and abstract photography, having a definite style that is very unique. David uses visualization and music to influence his compositions.   Currently, David resides in Fort Mohave, Arizona with his wife Maureen, five children, Casey, Trevor, Zach, Devin and Drake. He is also Papaw to Rory and Connor.  David has shown internationally and in the US during his 10 year artistic pursuits and is a big donor of art for charitable cause.  David has also dedicated his time to homeless causes and taught art at The Homeless Alliance, in Oklahoma city, after being a homeless teenager himself.



MoFlower1111

Soulcommon 1111


Starseed 1111

Sacred Way 111

Seeing Through 111

The Question 1111


Seeing Through 1111

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Day 76 Schyuler Kennedy

Taking his cues from comic books, traditional Mexican and indigenous folk art, cross cultural religious iconography and street art, Schuyler Kennedy’s work is a surreal blend of socio-political satire. Culling from the Eastern pantheons and belief systems and mixing them with the staunch Catholicism and bright colors of Mexican religious icons to craft new American Gods, Kennedy’s work provides a fun-house mirror reflection of the American religious and social quagmire, mixing life and death on his canvases like the acrylics on his palate. From imaginary self portraits to bees celebrating spine-supported highways of gold, Schuyler Kennedy provides a unique voice and vision of an outsider’s take on the inner workings of American society and the human psyche. 
Instagram @darkskyproductions

La Puta Pintada

RatKing(S)


Highways of Gold

Corazon Sagrado 


La Pistola, La Rosa


Monday, April 17, 2017

Day 75:Steve Failla

Steve Failla aka SPILLIGAN
I am a primarily self-taught artist born and raised in Arizona.  I have had some art education but do not recommend ever going to “art school” I believe that if you really want to be an artist all you have to do is create and let your audience come to you.  I was immersed in everything cool at a young age.  I was heavily influenced by music, art and film.  I daydreamed right through class doodling on schoolwork, chasing skirts and getting into trouble.  I like to explore the hypocrisy and weirdness in our society through my work.  My main goal is to produce work that makes you think and feel, whatever that emotion is.  If you feel anything after viewing my art then, it is successful. I have worked in several different medium logo design, short film, video games, sticker and shirt design, print work, and thousands of doodles.  It is my sincere hope to one day do this full-time and live my dream.
WEBSITE
Spilligan.com
FACEBOOK
Facebook.com/steve failla
Spilligan art – illustration –design
INSTAGRAM

@spilligan



Love is Pain


Mothman

Odin's Bane

Silence the Beast

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Day 74 :Ize art

   



(602) 770-1741
ize1251@gmail.com
izeart.com



 Artist Statement

  

    Many things in life have influenced my art: poetry, flowers, colors, architecture, fashion, design, culture, politics, music, as well as various artists. I consider my artwork to be simple, pleasing to the eye, and contemporary. I spend much time analyzing color and composition. Some paintings can take a few hours. Some can take days. Sometimes weeks. Detail, size, and subject matter are paramount. My art pieces have no title. Each person has different views, feelings, and interpretation. Each viewer also brings his/her own narrative to the artwork. I therefore want people to come up with their own title. I want to empower the viewer, and drag him/her in the creating process. As for my name, Ize. It is pronounced eyes. I chose that name to remind the viewer that visual art, before becoming an Intellectual process, is a visual adventure. The circle above my name symbolizes my desire to see as much as I can, encompass as many subjects as I can, and strive for excellence, of not perfection. 


How did you start with the name Ize?

I wanted to use a name that was simple and memorable. I also wanted to choose a name that had meaning behind it. I was listening to one of my favorite bands the night I came up with the name. The song was ‘Ize of the World’ by The Strokes. I thought that was perfect!  Ize is a suffix meaning to create when it’s attached to word. I use my thoughts, and ideas to create artistic images that let people visualize my creativity through their own eyes. The word is also pronounced as eyes. Although not all art is visual, I believe that the human eye plays a very significant role in the art world so I thought the name was perfect for me. The circle around my name reflects the sphere of the human eye. It’s just an extension to my name to create a simple but pleasurable logo. I felt that having a marketable logo would help gain my artwork some attention. I guess you could say I put a little thought to it.


Did you grow up in Phoenix, Arizona? If you did grow up how does being a native Arizona affect you as a person? Affect you in your art? If you came somewhere else, how does it affect you?

I was born in Mexico City but I consider my hometown Phoenix. I’ve been here since I was 3 so I feel more at home here. I’m not so sure if Arizona would have affected me in any other way compared to any other city or place. I believe that it’s the people you surround yourself with, and how you’re devoted to your passion that affects you. Those are just my thoughts. I hung out with a lot of artistic friends, watched movies, and played music. I fell in love with the album artwork of many of my favorite bands. I believe music brought more of my artistic passion out more than anything else. I had about 200 cd’s by the age 18, I then switched to vinyl. I used to burn cd’s and make replica cd album artwork just for fun and gave them to my friends. A few bands album covers I replicated where form The Velvet Underground, Oasis, Radiohead, and Weezer. I used watercolor, pencil, acrylic, and all sorts of mixed media. I still wonder if they have them. I did a lot detail on them.


You are a street artist? What is a street artist to you? How is the street art culture in Phoenix, Arizona?

I would say I’m a street artist, although others may disagree. I’m definitely not painting on trains or walls that may get me in trouble. I have a few ideas for some new pieces, some may consider those street art. The ones who do more of the risky painting, I’d say it’s quite respectable going to that extent if there’s a point or meaning behind the piece. I think its human nature to paint or draw on objects. A street artist to me is someone who creates art with no boundaries. Combining art with the environment that surrounds us, blending every day objects that we run into, and making something out of it. It should force your mind to think and view new ideas. There’s more of a political thing behind but I won’t in to it.

Who are your favorite local Phoenix street art talents? Who are your favorite international street art talents?

My favorite Phoenix artists are JBAK, Issac Caruso, Tyson Krank, Jeff Slim, JB Snyder, Jesse Perry, Lauren Lee, Carrie Marill, and Tato Caraveo. They all have such unique styles and are very talented. I’m still working to get as far as they have, but I still have a lot to work on.

Favorite international street artist are Ron English, Tabby, Pure Evil, Obey, Trust Icon, Andre Saraiva, Nychos, Martin Whatson, Dolk, Pobel, Tristan Eaton, Dasic Fernandez, MDMN, Dot Dot Dot, D Face, Icy and Sot, Ernest Zacharevic, C215, Ben Frost, Fintan Magee, FAILE, David Flores, Banksy, Keith Harrington, and Bambi are artist whom have given me the biggest inspiration to do what I love. Art. So when I think of street art I think of them and the list could go on. If you have a chance I’d recommend looking up their artwork, they such admirable pieces.

How do you market yourself as street artist on the web?

I have Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and my own website for my art. I follow many artists and I add anyone whom enjoys my work as a friend on my social media. I add new pieces to my sites and I’m constantly interacting with others to be in touch with the art community.

What mediums do you use?

I strictly use spray paint but sometimes acrylic. I’ve worked before with watercolors, oil paint, charcoal, markers, and pastels.

What sizes do you like to attempt? Do you like murals or small works? Both?

I first started with 16x20 pieces but now I’m working with much larger pieces. I’m currently working with 36x48 wooden panels. The largest I’ve done is 50ft x 40ft of a spaceman on 609 N 10th Avenue, Phoenix, AZ. I enjoy both small and large art pieces. I prefer the larger pieces because of the amount of detail you can add to it. I really want to get more murals under my belt; I’ve currently done only one sadly but I’m very grateful to have had the opportunity. I’m just hoping someone else will like my art work enough to let me paint another wall. I just have so many ideas in mind waiting to be painted.

What is your regular artistic process? How do you brainstorm a work before you go at it?

I look through Pintrest, Instagram, all sorts’ magazines, and art books. I save all the images on my computer, do a couple sketches, draw a stencil, cut the stencil, and then I’ll spray paint the image. I then make sure every detail is touched up. It sounds a lost easier on paper. Most of my time is consumed by cutting stencils depending on how detailed they are. I also put a lot of thought on the colors I use. I think it’s very important that the colors flow together. I just take many ideas from other artist or images I see and then I make them my own.

What is your regular artistic schedule? Do you work all day?

I work at a financial institution helping clients make transactions; it helps me support my art and myself for now. I look forward when I get home and start working on art. On the weekends when I’m off of work I tend to work all day on ideas and painting. I hope that someday I can live off of making art all day, that’s my true passion.

What do the patterns in the background mean? Where do you get the design patterns?

The patters in the background are a design I created to let people know that when they see a piece of mine they can easily identify it. I chose dots signify the sphere of an eye, which goes back to the meaning of my name. The stripes are there the image of the art piece with the dots.

Who are the people in your artwork? Who are they influenced by?

A lot of people in my work are models, random people, celebrities, politicians, iconic figures or subjects I find interesting. The influence behind them can be political, or just a really fun piece I thought would be great. But all most all of them have some meaning behind them. The style that I have has been influenced by a lot of artist I mentioned above as well, you might see some similarities. I just found a way to make mix all those styles and make my own in a sense.


How is it like volunteering for the Phoenix art museum? What age group do you volunteer? How does volunteering influence your art making? How does it influence your marketing?

I love working at the Phoenix Art Museum, what better way than to spend your free time walking around masterpieces and being a part of helping the art community. I work with all different kinds of age groups. I think giving back is really important, especially to kids. I feel like there’s not a lot of funding in regards to the Arts and that it’s been a subject that been overlooked. One day I’d like to have a nonprofit organization that helps children with eyesight problems and as well as to offer free art classes to children. As a kid art was my favorite subject but there was maybe one or two classes I could take and I never learned on how to make it as an artist. I started learning everything on my own by the time I graduated high school. I told people I wanted to be an artist, some told me I’d never make it, and that there’s no future in it. I just kept to myself and kept working hard learning as much as I could without any schooling. I’m still very new to people in the art industry but I want to show that I’m really passionate. I want kids to know if you love art do it, and do it with all your passion. It’s not a joke if you love it. I volunteer for the joy of helping others learn more about art. As for the marketing side of it, I’m just there help others enjoy art as much as I do.

How can the Phoenix art scene improve? How is it good already?


Phoenix should give more artist credit for the businesses and people they brought to Roosevelt Row. I feel artist are being pushed out and all the city cares about is building new apartment high rises on every corner. I remember when you could just show up to First Friday’s pick a spot and start selling paintings or play music wherever you’d like. Now you have to pay the city a fee to have a spot on that day. Artist brought a lot of new businesses to the downtown Phoenix area; I think Phoenix forgot to repay them. A lot of art studios and venues have been shutting down due to the higher increase in prices for the property. The art gallery I used to show has been closed down due to the same reason.  Phoenix needs to give artist their well-deserved spot back or at least help the community keep growing. Although there have been a lot of changes, Roosevelt Row is still an amazing area. New art pieces are popping up and the art community is still holding on strong. A lot of great artist are from phoenix and the vibe is really great when you want to sit down at a coffee shop, work on ideas, and sip on some coffee. There’s still a lot of growth to see, I just hope the city doesn’t push the art community away. I would like to see the city offer a wall for a new artist to paint a mural once a year. That would be awesome to see.


Media

Website: izeart.com
Instagram: ize_official
Facebook: facebook.com/izeartwork
Twitter: ize_official